Interactive Elements

While this link is more of an interactive graphic than it is an article I felt like it was still interesting enough to post about. Scientific American has created an interactive periodic table of elements full of interesting facts about each of the elements.

While I may not be a chemist I still appreciate chemistry a great deal and like to see people giving the periodic table a bit of a technological upgrade.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=chemistry-the-elements-revealed-interactive-periodic-table

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Wireless Health Care

This is an interesting article about the changing world of health care and how everything is moving towards wireless medicine. In the first paragraph alone we’re presented with a toilet that measures what’s in your urine, sensors implanted under the skin for remote monitoring, and a medicine cabinet that orders refills for your prescriptions, before the author mentions that your scale may soon keep track of your weight and urge you to get thinner. While it may all seem like an almost futuristic world where everything around your home is smarter and looks to analyze your health at every turn these technologies aren’t far off.

As our technology becomes more advanced and health care costs continue to rise there has to be a breaking point or a revolution in medicine that makes it easier for the average person to monitor their health and still be aware of health issues so that they can seek early treatment. With this revolution of technology physicians can literally examine the data from every point of our life to make sure we are being properly diagnose and cared for.

For all the details and to see some of the devices being tested today check out the full article. I for one am a little unsure about the coming change; while I like the sound of better health I can’t say that I want my appliances and house telling me what to eat.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/devices/wireless-health-care/0

Posted in Biomedical Engineering, Engineering, Medical | 1 Comment

Applications of Quantum Mechanics

While I admit this article is a little outside of my scientific area I find quantum mechanics as interesting as a physicist might. This slideshow article gives 10 applications of quantum mechanics that span the past, present, and future. I found it interesting and it’s an easier way to try and understand what this field has opened up for the world.

As for the equations behind each of these applications I’ll leave that to everyone else to try and completely understand. Our grasp of knowledge and the growth of science has made it almost impossible to understand every branch of science as others before us tried to.

http://curiosity.discovery.com/topic/applications-of-quantum-mechanics/10-real-world-applications-of-quantum-mechanics.htm

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Finding a Remedy for Metallic Hip Failures

I found this article interesting mostly because of the fact that it shows just how applicable so many of the classes I took in Biomedical Engineering are. As the title suggests surgeons are finding that metal-on-metal replacement hips are failing at a very high rate and causing patients a lot of problems. The article pinpoints a lot of basic Biomedical points that are very important to understand when designing a product for implantation. Essentially the problem here is that these metal-on-metal hip implants are being worn down and creating tiny pieces of metal dust that gets into the surrounding tissues. As I learned and others out there know this metal dust shouldn’t be in these areas so the body has an immune response where macrophages target these areas and try to engulf and remove the foreign material. The problem here is that there is so much of this metal dust that as it is broken down it becomes various ions that can react with the surrounding tissue and damage or completely destroy it.

This is a very important lesson to learn from which shows exactly how much studying needs to be done on products in the medical world, especially those bound for the inside of the human body.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/health/01hip.html?_r=2&smid=tw-nytimesscience&seid=auto

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5 Recent Breakthroughs in Nanomedicine

The future is definitely going to be on a nanoscale as we explore smaller and smaller particles and possibilities of the world around us. What some people may not know however is that their has already been a movement towards the nanoscale in the medical world. As an example try reading this article that explains five of these recent breakthroughs in a very understandable and approachable way.

I have to say all of these breakthroughs are going to make lives better, but if I’m being honest I would love to work on the research based around spinal cord repair. Being able to give a person mobility after some type of accident or disease is an amazing opportunity.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/09/30/the-smallest-revolution-five-recent-breakthroughs-in-nanomedicine/

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